218540

1985 $1 U.S. Federal Reserve Notes // Set of 5 Sequential Serial Numbers // Choice Crisp Uncirculated

"Product Description:
Federal Reserve Notes (FRNs) are the only form of banknotes currently produced in the United States. This type of currency was introduced in 1914, originally in a large-size format, before being reduced to the modern-day size in 1929 as a cost-cutting measure. Offered here is an uncommon set of 5 1985-dated $1 notes with sequential serial numbers in original choice crisp uncirculated condition. Your product is guaranteed to be genuine and will match the quality of the notes shown. Each note will be housed in an archival-quality plastic sleeve.


About Federal Reserve Notes
Federal Reserve Notes (FRNs) are the only banknotes currently produced in the United States. They were first authorized by Section 16 of the Federal Reserve Act of 1913 and are issued to the Federal Reserve Banks at the discretion of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System. The notes are then placed into circulation by the Banks, at which point they become liabilities of the Federal Reserve Banks and obligations of the United States. FRNs are legal tender and bear the obligation ""this note is legal tender for all debts, public and private"" printed on each note. They replaced United States Notes, which were once issued by the Treasury Department. FRNs are backed by the assets of the Federal Reserve Banks, which serve as collateral under Section 16. These assets are generally Treasury securities which have been purchased by the Federal Reserve through its Federal Open Market Committee in a process called debt monetizing. Series 1914 FRNs were the first of two large-size issues. Denominations were $5, $10, $20, $50, and $100, printed initially with a red seal and then later with a blue seal. Series 1918 notes were issued in $500, $1,000, $5,000, and $10,000 denominations. The 1914 and 1918 series notes measured approximately 7.4 x 3.1 inches. Notes of this era were often referred to as “horse blankets” due to their large size. As a cost-cutting measure, the size of FRNs was reduced in 1929 to the present-day smaller dimensions.
"

Thinking of selling a similar product? Find out more